SS #44: Prioritizing Words (with Angelina Stanford!)

Our guest today is Angelina Stanford! Angelina Stanford has a Master’s degree in English literature and has been teaching, writing, speaking, and training teachers for over 20 years. She is the co-star of the popular Close Reads podcast, as well as the new Shakespeare podcast, The Play’s the Thing. You can find Angelina at her website where she teaches class for middle school, high school, and adults. And look for her upcoming book, How to Understand Every Story: From Greek Gods to Superheroes, coming out next year.

Have you ever wondered why books are such a big deal in classical education? Wouldn’t it be easier to just pop in a movie and be done with all the lesson planning? It’s an interesting question, and Angelina Stanford, true to form, stood on her soapbox while giving Mystie and Brandy her answer. It was great.

 

 

 

Thank you to our sponsor:

This episode is sponsored by Charlotte Mason Boot Camp. Want to whip those Charlotte Mason muscles into shape? This intense, 6-week Charlotte Mason Boot Camp does just that! It’ll take that philosophical flab and turn it into nothing less than confidence. It’ll give you all the growing, stretching, and strengthening you’ve been looking for. There are three sessions of Charlotte Mason Boot Camp per year: spring, summer, and fall. To get on the interest list, click here and sign up!

 

Listen to the podcast:

 

Show Notes:

 

  • Topical Discussion: Prioritizing Words
    • Charlotte Mason quote:
      “People are naturally divided into those who read and think and those who do not read or think; and the business of schools is to see that all their scholars shall belong to the former class; it is worth while to remember that thinking is inseparable from reading which is concerned with the content of a passage and not merely with the printed matter.” Vol. 6, A Philosophy of Education, p. 31
    •  Robinson Crusoe
    • Rudyard Kipling
    • Aeneid
    • Anne White’s Guide for Plutarch

 

Please leave us a review in Apple Podcasts!

If you upgraded to iOS 11, you’ll find leaving a review easier than ever. Just go to Scholé Sisters in your subscriptions and scroll down.

The post SS #44: Prioritizing Words (with Angelina Stanford!) appeared first on Scholé Sisters.

Welcome to the Classical Grind

On a bright July morning in 2008, I was 8.5-months pregnant and very nauseous (always nauseous). We had also just moved, proving that difficult situations can always be made worse. But no matter. Our new house was perfect for us and today was designated the first day of school. I was determined, because I needed a month off post-partum. I gave the girls (aged 18 months and 3 years) something to distract them, and pulled out my then-shiny copy of Aesop’s Fables illustrated by Milo Winter.

It was time to teach someone how to narrate.

I’ll be honest: my firstborn is a naturally bookish child, just like his mother. I have often said he was God’s grace to me. He was just-turned-six and had been reading for three years. He was the easiest first student a homeschooling mother could ever have.

On that July morning, I had no clue what the next two years were going to be like. I didn’t know that I would almost lose the baby I was carrying during my c-section (he was tangled up in his cord very badly), or that I would lose half of my blood supply following that surgery. I didn’t know that I’d still be missing that blood six months later, and be very tired as a result. I didn’t know that before this baby was even a year old, I’d be standing over my husband’s ICU hospital bed, reading Psalms and David Hicks (yes, seriously) aloud to his comatose body because I didn’t know what else to do for him. I didn’t know I’d spend my second year of “real” homeschooling having to drive my husband when his friends couldn’t because his health problems caused the DMV to suspend his license for twelve months.

There was so much I didn’t know, especially that I needed an easy student oh so badly. But God, in His grace, like He often does, had provided for me in advance.

That easy student is going to be 16-years-old next week. He is still easy (unless you count driver’s training, or you think intensity is hard). He’s just about to finish his tenth year of AmblesideOnline, which has turned out to be even more wonderful than I’d hoped it’d be when Cindy Rollins introduced me to it a dozen years ago (it had only 6 years then and I assumed I’d have to figure out the upper grades myself when we got there).

When the junior high and high school years appeared, I assumed we’d use AO all the way through; we’d do all twelve years.

But that’s not how it’s working out.

Before I explain what next year is going to look like for my oldest, let me share a lesser-known Charlotte Mason quote with you:

There is certain knowledge, no doubt, which it is shameful not to possess, and, wanting which, the mind is as limp, feeble, and incapable as an ill-nourished body. There is also a time for sowing the seed of this knowledge, an intellectual as well as a natural springtime; and it would be interesting to examine the question, how far it is possible to prosecute any branch of knowledge, the sowing and germination of which has not taken place in early youth. It follows that the first three lustres [a lustre is French for “five years;” three lustres is 15 years] belong to what we may call the synthetic stage of education, during which his reading should be wide and varied enough to allow the young scholar to get into living touch with earth-knowledge, history, literature, and much besides. These things are necessary for his intellectual life, and are especially necessary to give him material for the second stage of his education, the analytic, which, indeed, continues with us to the end. It is in this second stage that the value of the classical and mathematical grind comes in. It produces a certain sanity of judgment, and therefore a certain capacity for affairs, an ability for the examination of questions, which are rather the distinguishing marks of the public schoolman, — not merely the university man, that is another matter, but the man who has ground through that Greek play which both Pen and the young Goethe contrived to get out of.

I love this quote, because it encouraged me to focus on poetic knowledge even in junior high and early high school, when there is so much pressure to specialize and analyze. And we’ve gone a whole year past the end of the “first three lustres” — he turned 15 at the end of his freshman year, after all. I still view myself primarily as a sower of seeds.

A little over a month ago, we became aware of a special opportunity. Eric Hall (who was featured in this episode of Scholé Sisters) announced that he was setting up a 2-year high school great books program for homeschoolers that will meet at our church’s office once per week. The total program will cover literature, history, Bible, and philosophy — there will be assigned readings throughout the week. Did our family want to join?

I was more concerned with what our son wanted. He’s a good kid, I thought.

His feelings surprised me. Naturally, he was interested in the curriculum. But being a scholar at heart doesn’t make him different from any other young man his age: he has a deep desire to be more with his peers — to read books with them (not me).

It looks like we’re unexpectedly beginning a weaning stage this year. Our tutor collection has officially added up — Mr. Hall and Mr. Thomas (Latin and Koine Greek) and Chad (more Koine Greek) and Rahime (math) are providing so many subjects that there isn’t much left for me to direct. I’m basically left with chemistry (boo), Ourselves, and a couple other things.

Oh. And all those other kids I have that will be glad for and, I think, need more attention.

Mr. Hall could never be a grind. He wears what David Hicks called the classical schoolmaster’s “wry smile.” But he will ask my son to work hard, to maintain his focus, to get through the Greek play or whatever else Goethe tried to get out of.

I always knew that Charlotte Mason was the ideal preparation for classical scholarship in the late teens and beyond. What I didn’t know that I was going to blink one day in 2008 and suddenly it’d be 2018 and we’d be ready for that.

 

The post Welcome to the Classical Grind appeared first on Afterthoughts.

SS #37: Livin’ La Vida Latin (with Angela Reed!)

Brandy is talking at length about Latin today with Angela Reed. Angela is a homeschooling mother of five in the Sunshine State of Florida. A former classroom teacher, degreed in Classics and Latin and persuaded by Charlotte Mason’s educational philosophy, she channels these enthusiasms onto Instagram: building community with friends @charlottemasonirl, researching how Latin fits within a CM paradigm @thecmlatinproject, and documenting family life, homeschooling, and the day-to-day @athena_amidstthereeds.

Brandy asks Angela some of the tough questions we all want answers to: Why Latin first is the New Testament is in Greek? Can I do a modern language instead of Latin? Why Latin at all?? Can I do Latin with my children when I don’t know Latin myself? We tackle these, plus Angela helps us decide which pronunciation to you and shares about some of her favorite curricula.

 

 

Thank you to our sponsor:

This episode is sponsored by Plan Your Year. Plan Your Year is the homeschool planner that shows you how. It walks you step-by-step through creating a homeschool plan unique to your home, your kids, your family. There are over 40 printable planning pages plus an 80-page planning guide where Pam walks you through creating your plan. Nothing ever expires and you get free updates every year. It’s the only homeschool planner you will ever need. Click here to check out a free sample pack of planning pages.

 

Listen to the podcast:

 

Show Notes:

 

 

 

Please leave us a review in Apple Podcasts!

If you upgraded to iOS 11, you’ll find leaving a review easier than ever. Just go to Scholé Sisters in your subscriptions and scroll down.

The post SS #37: Livin’ La Vida Latin (with Angela Reed!) appeared first on Scholé Sisters.

SS #37: Livin’ La Vida Latin (with Angela Reed!)

Brandy is talking at length about Latin today with Angela Reed. Angela is a homeschooling mother of five in the Sunshine State of Florida. A former classroom teacher, degreed in Classics and Latin and persuaded by Charlotte Mason’s educational philosophy, she channels these enthusiasms onto Instagram: building community with friends @charlottemasonirl, researching how Latin fits within a CM paradigm @thecmlatinproject, and documenting family life, homeschooling, and the day-to-day @athena_amidstthereeds.

Brandy asks Angela some of the tough questions we all want answers to: Why Latin first is the New Testament is in Greek? Can I do a modern language instead of Latin? Why Latin at all?? Can I do Latin with my children when I don’t know Latin myself? We tackle these, plus Angela helps us decide which pronunciation to you and shares about some of her favorite curricula.

 

 

Thank you to our sponsor:

This episode is sponsored by Plan Your Year. Plan Your Year is the homeschool planner that shows you how. It walks you step-by-step through creating a homeschool plan unique to your home, your kids, your family. There are over 40 printable planning pages plus an 80-page planning guide where Pam walks you through creating your plan. Nothing ever expires and you get free updates every year. It’s the only homeschool planner you will ever need. Click here to check out a free sample pack of planning pages.

 

Listen to the podcast:

 

Show Notes:

 

 

 

Please leave us a review in Apple Podcasts!

If you upgraded to iOS 11, you’ll find leaving a review easier than ever. Just go to Scholé Sisters in your subscriptions and scroll down.

The post SS #37: Livin’ La Vida Latin (with Angela Reed!) appeared first on Scholé Sisters.

SS #32: Paideia Is All Greek to Me

In today’s episode, Mystie Winckler and Brandy Vencel discuss Werner Jaeger’s introduction to his three-volume series, what Paideia: The Ideals of Greek Culture, Jaeger’s definition of education, what culture is, why Christians are resistant to honoring the Greeks, and much more. Download to listen, subscribe and be a Sister!

 

 

Thank you to our sponsor:

This episode is sponsored by The Afterthinker’s Guide to Charlotte Mason’s Home Education. That’s right! Brandy has a NEW Charlotte Mason study guide out for 2018! Home Education, Charlotte Mason’s seminal work on educational philosophy and character development, is a must-read for every homeschooling parent seeking to nurture her children with the rich nutrients of life and literature. The Afterthinker’s Guide to Charlotte Mason’s Home Education is your key to unlocking these nourishing educational truths in your home! Tested and refined through her own research and group leadership, Brandy Vencel has developed a pair of guides for this valuable endeavor: one for group leaders and one for group members. Don’t let the different versions fool: these guides can be used for group or individual study. Click here to get your copy!

 

Listen to the podcast:

 

Show Notes:

 

 

 

Please leave us a review in Apple Podcasts!

If you upgraded to iOS 11, you’ll find leaving a review easier than ever. Just go to Scholé Sisters in your subscriptions and scroll down.

The post SS #32: Paideia Is All Greek to Me appeared first on Scholé Sisters.

SS #30: Putting the Merry Back in Christmas

Today, the Scholé Sisters get real about Christmas. Mystie says we can be classical not just in our approach to education, but also in our approach to happiness. Does the classical tradition have something to offer us at Christmas as well? We talk about depression and grief, yes, but also bad attitudes and dangerous expectations, all in an attempt to encourage all of us toward a better Christmas. Christmas is important, because the incarnation is important. Let’s never forget what it’s all about.

 

 

Thank you to our sponsor:

This episode is sponsored by Christmas Morning Time Plans. These plans are FREE from Pam Barnhill! Three weeks of Morning Time plans, loosely organized around Tchaikovsky’s magical Nutcracker music. This set has it all: poetry, fine arts, nature study, good books, and so much more, prepared for you with your choice of a grid or loop schedule to follow. Advent has already started, but if you’re behind and need some plans, these are perfect. Click here to download your free copy.

 

Listen to the podcast:

 

Show Notes:

 

 

 

Please leave us a review in Apple Podcasts!

If you upgraded to iOS 11, you’ll find leaving a review easier than ever. Just go to Scholé Sisters in your subscriptions and scroll down.

 

 

The post SS #30: Putting the Merry Back in Christmas appeared first on Scholé Sisters.