WAYS TO FEED YOUR CHILD MORE VEGETABLES

WAYS TO FEED YOUR CHILD MORE VEGETABLES

Fruit is naturally low in calories, high in fiber, and loaded with crucial vitamins and minerals for healthy growth and development. How can you get your kids to eat more fruit? Telling a toddler it will help ease her constipation certainly won’t do the trick. And, the more you coax your children to eat something, the more they’ll push back. Here are some tips to use so that your children will eat veggies.

Set an example
Kids eat what they know, and they won’t ask for a special meal if they do not know it is an option. By far the best predictor of a child’s eating behavior is the eating patterns of her parents. If vegetables and healthy foods are relegated to an afterthought in your household, it’s tough to expect your kids to take to them.

Make food fun
Broccoli can be intimidating to a kid hoping for macaroni and cheese. But if he is a dinosaur who needs to eat five miniature trees in order to outrun a tyrannosaurus rex, suddenly those florets are a lot more interesting. Relating healthy food to fun things the child already loves and turning it into a game is a great way to get a few bites of greens down the hatch. Try making it more fun by inventing a child friend snacks or dishes.

Get them involved
Children are more invested in a meal if they help with its preparation. Taking your kids with you to the farmers market or grocery store and letting them pick one or two things to cook for dinner can make them far more excited to eat it later. Better yet, start a garden and teach them how to plant and harvest their own. Letting them to clean carrots, snap beans, mix the dressing and set the table gives them a sense of pride and makes them more enthusiastic and cooperative at meal time.

ONE BITE RULE
According to a research children who have initially rejected a food must be exposed to it at least 8-10 times for the food to be accepted. Many parents have had success with the “one bite rule,” requiring the child to try at least one solid mouthful of a rejected food whenever it is served. After enough exposures the food will be more familiar to the child and usually they begin to rate it more favorably.

Reward good behavior
On the other side of the coin, creating positive food experiences can decrease picky eating tendencies. Research has shown that rewarding a child for trying one bite of a rejected food with things like stickers makes it easier for them to try the food.

Offer diverse food colors

One thing you have working in your favor is that children like colorful foods. You can expose them to more colors by adding more vegetables to their plates. While adults tend to like flavors mingled together, children often prefer them separate.

Arrange food in patterns on the plate
Another reason to cook different vegetables separately is that children love when their food is designed into patterns on their plate. Unlike adults, who prefer foods clumped near each other in the center of the plate, kids like their food separated into piles around the perimeter. Try creating different shapes that is appealing to them

TEACHING YOUR CHILD or STUDENT TO READ

TEACHING YOUR CHILD or STUDENT TO READ

Having a hard time trying your child or your student to read? Reading is the foundation of all learning. So they need to fully understand it and love it. Try to make it a fun activity for your children. Here are some tips for you to easily teach your child to read and have their own vocabulary. Here are some areas that you can focus while they are developing their reading skills.
 
PHONEMIC AWARENESS
Effective reading instruction begins by ensuring that students have mastered phonemic awareness, which is the ability to identify, manipulate, and substitute phonemes the smallest units of sound. Phonemic awareness lays the groundwork for learning to associate individual sounds with written letters commonly known as phonics.

PHONICS
Phonics is an instructional method that associates written letters and letter combinations with the sounds of spoken language. Once letters are linked to sounds, they are no longer meaningless marks; they are the building blocks of words. Phonics strategies help students develop basic skills for decoding the words they read as well as spelling the words they write.

FLUENCY
Fluency is the ability to read text accurately and quickly, either silently or orally. Researchers have found that fluent reading at the word level is established after an individual reads a word at least four times using accurate phonologic processing. Fluency is built word by word and is based on repeated, accurate sounding out of the word. Fluency is not established by “memorizing” what words look like but rather by developing correct neural-phonologic models of the word.

VOCABULARY
Vocabulary is an expandable, stored set of words that students know the meanings of and use. Vocabulary has both print and speech forms. Spoken vocabulary plays an important role in word recognition. Beginning readers use their spoken vocabulary to recognize words that they encounter in print. When students “sound out” a written word, they try to connect that word to a word in their spoken vocabulary.  If the word they are reading is not in their spoken vocabulary, that word will interrupt their reading. That new word must be learned, in both form and meaning, before it can be added to their vocabulary.

COMPREHENSION
Reading comprehension is the ability to understand, remember, and communicate meaning from what has been read. Comprehension is the purpose and the goal of reading, but comprehension depends on students being able to access the text, which can only happen after they have already mastered certain phonemic awareness and phonics skills.

Easy to Make Paper Kite for Kids

Easy to Make Paper Kite for Kids

Things to prepare:

  • 5” x 11” paper
  • Barbecue stick
  • Threadj
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Ribbon with wide area

What to do?

  1. Fold the piece of paper in half.
  2. Mark a point on the top of the paper about one inch from the fold.
  3. Mark a point on the bottom of the paper about one inch from the open side.
  4. Imagine, or draw, a line connecting these two dots.
  5. Fold the top corner of the paper down along the line that you’ve just created.
  6. Next, flip the paper over and fold the other side down to match the side you just folded.
  7. Flip the paper back over so that it looks the way it did in Step 5.
  8. Tape along the middle layer.
  9. Place a barbecue stick across the kite, as shown, and tape it in place. You’ll probably have to cut the barbecue stick down to size with your scissors.
  10. Flip the kite back over and straighten the part of it that looks like a spine.
  11. Mark a spot about a third of the way down the spine, and about half an inch from the edge. Put tape over this mark to reinforce it on both sides.
  12. Use your scissors to make a hole in this spot.
  13. Tie your kite string through this hole. Make sure to use a good knot!
  14. Tape a length of ribbon to the back of the kite, at the bottom.

Now, your kite is ready to fly!  Enjoy flying your kite!

Lesson Plan: Matter (Solids, Liquids and Gases)

Lesson Plan: Matter (Solids, Liquids and Gases)

Lesson Plan
Explore the concept of matter by having a variety of objects to touch. Explore Solid, Liquid and Gaseous objects.

  • Prepare solid objects like wooden blocks, kitchen utensils, toys etc…
  • Prepare liquid objects like a cup of water, oil, juice etc…
  • Prepare a balloon filled with air, or use a handheld fan to demonstrate moving gases. Smelling perfume in the air can demonstrate the medium.

Involve the child senses to explore the objects.

Consult a medical specialist should a child have sensory difficulties. Be cautious as perfume may irritate children.

Estimated Lesson Time

  • 5-30 mins

Resources

  • Common household objects, toys, cup of water/oil/juice, balloon, perfume.

Prior Learning

  • No prior activities needed.

Next Lesson

  • Lesson Plan: Solids
  • Lesson Plan: Liquids
  • Lesson Plan: Gases
Lesson Plan: Sounds

Lesson Plan: Sounds

Lesson Plan
Babies and toddlers (<1 year) can be stimulated using sounds, colours, textures. Exposing children to sensory information is best done by self-exploration. Some children (e.g. like the only child or the first child) may need encouragement by demonstration. Playgroups are useful for early learning as a child may learn by observing other children.

  • Join a local playgroup
  • Provide a suite of small, safe instruments like bells, shakers, drums

Babies and Toddlers need regular naps. Such activities shouldn’t take very long. Stimulation of a baby would typically occur after feeding.

Its important to direct playtime, co-ordinating it with sleeptime. Consult a medical specialist should a child have sensory difficulties.

Estimated Lesson Time

  • 5-20 mins

Resources

  • Bells, Drums, Shakers

Prior Learning

  • No prior activities needed.

Related Learning

  • Lesson Plan: Colors

Next Lessons

  • Lesson Plan: Musical Instruments

 

Lesson Plan: Reading

Lesson Plan: Reading

Lesson Plan
Reading needs to be encouraged in the early years of a child’s development. Multi-lingual children may have challenges focusing on a single language. The simplest way of facilitating reading is to provide lots of books.

Children often learn by mimicking adults. So when you read for your child, they will eventually mimic your actions by attempting to do the same. Older siblings often do this by reading aloud for their younger siblings.

The ability to read forms a foundation for a child to gain access to knowledge from books and other media.

Estimated Lesson Time

  • 10-45 mins

Prior Learning

  • NA

Next Lessons

  • Lesson Plans: Numbers