A group of students has developed a way of storing energy

A group of students has developed a way of storing energy

Students from Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands created the world’s first bus that runs on formic acid, which is a much cheaper solution than hydrogen, yet it delivers the same environmental benefits,” says Lucas van Cappellen from Team Fast, a spin-off company from Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. Students are endeavoring to develop emissions-free transport that will help in the global battle against climate change. And they’re also trying to create careers for themselves. They developed a way of storing energy that could be cheaper to make, more practical and more sustainable than alternative renewable fuels. Formic acid is found in nature, delivered in the stings and bites of ants and other insects the Latin word for ant is formica. And this simple carboxylic acid (chemical formula HCOOH) is already used in textiles and leather processing, as a livestock feed preservative, and is also found in some household limescale removers. The students found a way the acid can efficiently carry the ingredients needed for hydrogen fuel cells, used to power electric vehicles. The fuel, which the team has dubbed hydrozine (not to be confused with hydrazine), is a liquid, which means you can transport it easily and refill vehicles quickly, as with conventional fuels. They claimed that the fuel is much cleaner and cheaper. To prove the concept in the real world, an electric bus is set to hit the road in the Netherlands later this year, where it will shuttle between running on conventional bus routes and appearing at promotional events and industry fairs. The bus has an electric drive system, developed by bus builder VDL, that receives additional power from the formic acid fuel cell system mounted in a range-extender trailer, towed behind. According to them if they prove that we can build a bus that meets the needs of bus companies, with a range of around 400km and quick refueling, we will have shown the potential of hydrozine in a segment where there is no sustainable competition yet.

COOL GAME ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG STUDENTS

COOL GAME ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG STUDENTS

A Perfect Square
For this game you’ll need a long rope and several blind folds. Gather the group together, have them sit in a circle and place their blindfolds on their heads. Take a rope with the ends tied together and give it to the group. Their goal is to form a perfect square out of the rope without taking off their blindfolds. Allow them as much time as they like – once they are happy they have formed a square, they can take off their blindfolds and observe their handywork. Variations of this game include preventing some team members from talking. Themes that will come out of this game include leadership, communication, team work and trust.

Aardvark Relay
To play this game, you will need to divide the group into teams (the number of teams depends on the area you have available and group size). You will need some equipment for this game.  Place empty bowls on one side of the room and bowls full of dried peas on the other side.  Make sure there are an equal number of peas in each bowl.  Give each team member a straw. The aim of the game is for each team to transport a small pile of dried peas from a bowl on one side of the room to another bowl on the other side, using only their straw.  They do this by sucking through the straw so the pea stays fixed to the end of the straw.  If they drop the pea they must pick it up again using the straw the winning team is the one that transports all the peas first.

Animal Farm
This is a quick, fun activity to divide your group into smaller groups.  Give each person a card or post-it note with the name of a farm animal on it. To find the rest of their group, they must make the sound of the animal from their card, and then assemble into groups based on their animal. Variations include blindfolding participants, or having different types of sounds

Blanket Volleyball
This game is just like normal volleyball, but each team is given a blanket. The team should stand around the edge of the blanket, stretching it out so it is tight.  The ‘serving’ team should start by placing the ball on the blanket, loosening then bringing it tight so it ‘throws’ the ball over the net.  The other team then uses their blanket to catch the ball then throw it back. It’s an interesting and fun variation to a game we’re all familiar with.

Can Robotics Bring STEM Learning to Life?

Can Robotics Bring STEM Learning to Life?

Robotics seems to have renewed interest in STEM courses like none other. It brings science, technology, engineering and mathematics which were earlier taught as four different subjects, together as one. It has often been highlighted that there is a growing shortage of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) professionals in the US. With innovative ways of teaching emerging with robotics, it is fast becoming the new R of learning in the new technology-driven world. Educational robotics has emerged as a field which involves students, coding, designing, developing and operating robots, thereby facilitating the development of their understanding and application of various subjects. Many programs combining STEM and Robotics have started in the recent years that facilitate this form of teaching in schools, even at the elementary level. They use STEM-friendly robot kids to teach fundamental engineering concepts, design, building, testing, development, and basics of coding. Students collaborate and develop robots to solve realistic problems like the need for quick transportation. Direct application of knowledge increases the interest of students in the subjects and develops an innovative mindset at a young age. As per FIRST ®, 89% of its students who actively participated in such competitions took up STEM courses at the student or professional level. This helps develop their interest in subjects like mathematics, coding, engineering, science and technology which lead innovation. Learning is more fun and faster, as compared to the traditional ways of imparting education. Being more interactive and creative, it has a high level of engagement leading students to pursue STEM courses even after high school. As students learn and apply their knowledge in STEM, they prepare themselves to be future problem solvers and innovators. This mode of education focused on innovation has brought STEM back to life, reviving the interest of students in the subject and is expected to design the future of education.

4 YEAR OLD GIRL SPEAKS 7 LANGUAGES

4 YEAR OLD GIRL SPEAKS 7 LANGUAGES

Bella Devyatkina is now wowing people all over the world after she easily switched languages. Bella literally stunned audiences when she spoke seven languages fluently on a TV show. Bella is actually able to communicate in these languages, as her knowledge exceeds the vocabulary of simple ‘small talk’. Besides her native Russian, Bella also speaks English, German, Spanish, French, Chinese and Arabic
thatincludes the six official United Nations languages with the addition of German. According to Bella’s mother that they started teaching her Russian and English when she was only two and noticed her interest in linguistics. Gradually they started adding more languages to her schedule, and she now studies with native speakers. Internet users have accused Bella’s mother of stripping the girl of her childhood, but neuropsychologist Anna Semenovich told the public that there was nothing to worry about. According to Semenovich If the girl is learning languages through curiosity, if her parents managed to build a schedule that works as a game it will only benefit her. She’s not studying, she’s playing! Some experts believes that Bella will not lose her knowledge, but warns that at some point it can become ‘frozen’ if she does not continue to use and practice it. Back In pre-revolutionary Russia, if a child from a noble family couldn’t speak three-four languages by the age of five or six, it was a shame to take him out. Then in school Latin and ancient Greek were added to those. So five-six languages were a standard package for an educated youth back in 19th-century Russia,

Online Education Institute

Online Education Institute

CEO Eva Moskowitz founder of SUCCESS ACADEMY INSTITU said that she had two goals when she launched New York City’s largest charter school network a decade ago: Open high-performing schools while working to improve American education more broadly. She said, but a new online platform aims to grow the network’s footprint beyond America’s largest school district. Her plans to expand Success Academy outside of New York City aren’t currently part of the equation. Success Academy Institute unveiled Wednesday from their headquarters in Lower Manhattan, the free portal offers access to the curriculum and teacher development strategies that are employed at Success Academy’s 41 schools across the city. According to Moskowitz there are far too many kids across the country who are trapped in schools where they don’t learn to read and write and do mathematics and science at the most basic level, so we feel incredible pressure to be part of the solution. Success Academy’s track record in closing the achievement gap and improving the academic outcomes of low-income students of color was recognized this week when it won the $250,000 Broad Prize, which is meant for college readiness programs, such as scholarships or campus visits. The online platform, which currently offers the charter network’s literacy curriculum for kindergarten through fourth grade, is the first step in a broader effort to introduce teachers across the country to the Success Academy mantra. In the fall, the network plans to open a teacher-training facility at Hudson Yards in Manhattan with a lab school for students in kindergarten through eighth grade. The network has grown from one school to more than 40 in a decade, making it larger than 95 percent of school districts across the country. It reported in April receiving roughly 17,000 applications for 3,017 available seats for the 2017-18 school year. Moskowitz and the network have come under fire, particularly for strict discipline, emphasis on test prep and allegations that it fails to serve or push out high-needs or underperforming students. Success has denied that charge.